Welcome, Guest

You are not logged in.
Logo
My BootlegZone
Main Site | Section News | Forum | Links | Hall Of Shame | Scans+ | FAQ | Contact
 Register
 Log in
 My profile
 My trader ratings
 My message box
 My trade list
 My want list
 My in-process list
 Potential traders
 JADE - My draft files
 Log out


Welcome to
t1esto123,
our newest member !


Members list
Member Search:
33 users online:
no members and 33 guests

So you want to expand your bootleg collection ?
Why don't you become a Bootlegzone Member ?
It's FREE !




The Beatles
 Section news
 Latest updates
 All files by publisher
 All files alphabetically
 Core collection
 Completist's collection
 Songs encyclopedia
 Most owned
 Most wanted
Beatles Sections:
 The Beatles
 John Lennon
 Paul McCartney
 George Harrison
 Ringo Starr
Beatles Pages
 The Ultimate Beatleg Guide
 Articles
Other Sections
 0-9
 A
 B
 C
 D
 E
 F
 G
 H
 I
 J
 K
 L
 M
 N
 O
 P
 Q
 R
 S
 T
 U
 V
 W
 X
 Y
 Z
BootlegZone
 What's new
 Latest updates
 Forum
 Beatleg links
 Most owned items
 Most wanted items
 Hall Of Shame
 Contact


The Beatles - The Complete Hollywood Bowl Concerts (CD 1)

[ Reviews ] [ Want lists ] [ Trade lists ] [ Add to my trade/want list ]




Scan submitted/created by [aral2]
HQ Scans:
Publisher: ReproMan
Reference :RPM101
Date :1997
Made In :USA
Quality :
Booklet & packaging :
Total duration: 73:10

Comments
2 CD-R Clone Box set of Midnight Beat box set. MBCD108/109.

Sources say that there is no loss of quality.

Core collection    Track identified    Version validated    Lyrics available    Version details available    Audio excerpt available    Participants list available   
1.
Introduction(The Beatles Section)
05:43
Concert intro/announcement
Version validated
Concert
Los Angeles, Hollywood Bowl
23 Aug 1964
C.640823
The Beatles
Hollywood Bowl.
2.
Twist And Shout(Russell/Medley)
01:16
Song
Version validated
Concert
Los Angeles, Hollywood Bowl
23 Aug 1964
C640823.01
The Beatles
Hollywood Bowl.
3.
You Can't Do That(Lennon/McCartney)
02:58
Song
Version validated
Concert
Los Angeles, Hollywood Bowl
23 Aug 1964
C640823.02
The Beatles
Hollywood Bowl.
4.
All My Loving(Lennon/McCartney)
02:11
Song
Version validated
Concert
Los Angeles, Hollywood Bowl
23 Aug 1964
C640823.03
The Beatles
Hollywood Bowl.
5.
She Loves You(Lennon/McCartney)
02:31
Song
Version validated
Concert
Los Angeles, Hollywood Bowl
23 Aug 1964
C640823.04
The Beatles
Hollywood Bowl.
6.
Things We Said Today(Lennon/McCartney)
02:10
Song
Version validated
Concert
Los Angeles, Hollywood Bowl
23 Aug 1964
C640823.05
The Beatles
Hollywood Bowl.
7.
Roll Over Beethoven(Berry)
03:01
Song
Version validated
Concert
Los Angeles, Hollywood Bowl
23 Aug 1964
C640823.06
The Beatles
Hollywood Bowl.
8.
Can't Buy Me Love(Lennon/McCartney)
02:27
Song
Version validated
Concert
Los Angeles, Hollywood Bowl
23 Aug 1964
C640823.07
The Beatles
Hollywood Bowl.
9.
If I Fell(Lennon/McCartney)
02:12
Song
Version validated
Concert
Los Angeles, Hollywood Bowl
23 Aug 1964
C640823.08
The Beatles
Hollywood Bowl.
10.
I Want To Hold Your Hand(Lennon/McCartney)
03:04
Song
Version validated
Concert
Los Angeles, Hollywood Bowl
23 Aug 1964
C640823.09
The Beatles
Hollywood Bowl.
11.
Boys(Dixon/Farrell)
02:17
Song
Version validated
Concert
Los Angeles, Hollywood Bowl
23 Aug 1964
C640823.10
The Beatles
Hollywood Bowl.- Stereo
12.
A Hard Day's Night(Lennon/McCartney)
03:15
Song
Version validated
Concert
Los Angeles, Hollywood Bowl
23 Aug 1964
C640823.11
The Beatles
Hollywood Bowl.- Stereo
13.
Long Tall Sally(Johnson/Penniman/Blackwell)
03:56
Song
Version validated
Concert
Los Angeles, Hollywood Bowl
23 Aug 1964
C640823.12
The Beatles
Hollywood Bowl.- Stereo
14.
Introduction(The Beatles Section)
01:10
Concert intro/announcement
Version validated
Concert
Los Angeles, Hollywood Bowl
30 Aug 1965
C.650830
The Beatles
Hollywood Bowl.- Stereo
15.
Twist And Shout(Russell/Medley)
01:21
Song
Version validated
Concert
Los Angeles, Hollywood Bowl
30 Aug 1965
C650830.01
The Beatles
Hollywood Bowl.- Stereo
16.
She's A Woman(Lennon/McCartney)
03:09
Song
Version validated
Concert
Los Angeles, Hollywood Bowl
30 Aug 1965
C650830.02
The Beatles
Hollywood Bowl.- Stereo
17.
I Feel Fine(Lennon/McCartney)
02:43
Song
Version validated
Concert
Los Angeles, Hollywood Bowl
30 Aug 1965
C650830.03
The Beatles
Hollywood Bowl.- Stereo
18.
Dizzy Miss Lizzy(Williams)
03:32
Song
Version validated
Concert
Los Angeles, Hollywood Bowl
30 Aug 1965
C650830.04
The Beatles
Hollywood Bowl.- Stereo
19.
Ticket To Ride(Lennon/McCartney)
03:16
Song
Version validated
Concert
Los Angeles, Hollywood Bowl
30 Aug 1965
C650830.05
The Beatles
Hollywood Bowl.- Stereo
20.
Everybody's Trying To Be My Baby(Perkins)
02:53
Song
Version validated
Concert
Los Angeles, Hollywood Bowl
30 Aug 1965
C650830.06
The Beatles
Hollywood Bowl.- Stereo
21.
Can't Buy Me Love(Lennon/McCartney)
02:38
Song
Version validated
Concert
Los Angeles, Hollywood Bowl
30 Aug 1965
C650830.07
The Beatles
Hollywood Bowl.- Stereo
22.
Baby's In Black(Lennon/McCartney)
02:49
Song
Version validated
Concert
Los Angeles, Hollywood Bowl
30 Aug 1965
C650830.08
The Beatles
Hollywood Bowl.- Stereo
23.
I Wanna Be Your Man(Lennon/McCartney)
02:48
Song
Version validated
Concert
Los Angeles, Hollywood Bowl
30 Aug 1965
C650830.09
The Beatles
Hollywood Bowl.- Stereo
24.
A Hard Day's Night(Lennon/McCartney)
03:09
Song
Version validated
Concert
Los Angeles, Hollywood Bowl
30 Aug 1965
C650830.10
The Beatles
Hollywood Bowl.- Stereo
25.
Help!(Lennon/McCartney)
03:06
Song
Version validated
Concert
Los Angeles, Hollywood Bowl
30 Aug 1965
C650830.11
The Beatles
Hollywood Bowl.- Stereo
26.
I'm Down(Lennon/McCartney)
03:25
Song
Version validated
Concert
Los Angeles, Hollywood Bowl
30 Aug 1965
C650830.12
The Beatles
Hollywood Bowl.- Stereo
Core collection    Track identified    Version validated    Lyrics available    Version details available    Audio excerpt available    Participants list available   


Song Song Studio chat Studio chat
TV/Radio chat/jingle TV/Radio chat/jingle Interview Interview
Cover by another artist Cover by another artist Film Music/Orchestral Film music/orchestral
Concert intro/announcement Concert intro/announcement Advertising Advertising
Song by another artist Song by another artist Medley title Medley title
Book chapter Book chapter
Other type of track Other


Reviews

Review by: Chris Johnson, moptop@altavista.netOn
Both the 23 Aug 1964 and 30 Aug 1965 have been available for along time from various sources, but for the first time is the 29 Aug 1965 concert.

The quality is excellent and in True Stereo.

I fail to see how any future release could better this set. Should Apple ever release this material they could do a lot worse than 'Clone' this production.
Review by: Matthew,On 15 Dec 1999
If you're lucky enough to find Midnight Beat's release of this, BUY IT NOW! But if you see this clone of it from Repro-Man (a.k.a. Vigotone) don't pass on it! The sound is perfect, and it has all the liner notes of the original!
Review by: Jim Coburn, jcgolf44@aol.comOn 28 Apr 2000
The 2 CD set contains 3 great Hollywood Bowl Shows in perfect stereo. Although two of these shows have been available for quite some time, this is the first time the 1964 show is in stereo. The Midnight Beat version was the first to appear and the Reproman are direct clones. This set came in a nice box and the Repoman came with better cover and booklet.
Review by: Vesuvius7On 12 Aug 2006 at 00:40 CEST
The significance usually attached—justifiably—by most Beatle fans to these famous concerts merits a detailed review of the music played by the band for the occasion. I will hence write a description of every track in the set.

This set contains the entire 3 concerts that the Beatles gave in 1964 and 1965 at the Hollywood Bowl in Los Angeles, as well as the press conferences that they gave in August 29, 1965 before going on stage. These performances are justifiably considered by many fans to be among the band’s finest. For that very reason many fans believe that it is just a question of time before Apple Corp. decides to issue these wonderful live recordings. John, however, was somewhat dismissive of them in his famous (some say infamous) interview with Jan Werner from December 1970 because he felt that the band was nervous as a result of playing before an audience of Hollywood celebrities. His remarks can be heard in “Lennon Remember: Life with the Lions”, Disc 2, track 3. See:

http://www.bootlegzone.com/album.php?name=dd005§ion=2

Despite some minor vocal mistakes and the many glitches in the sound, due primarily to Paul’s microphone (or amplifier for his voice, as John is heard saying at one point) malfunctioning, the raw intensity of these performances more than makes up for their numerous shortcomings. The band’s great performances at the Budokan in Toyo from 1966 are nearly flawless from a musical point of view and from a technical point of view are far superior, but in my opinion they can’t match the raw emotional intensity of the performances reproduced in this set.

One of the joys of listening to these performances is that the band performs in mid 1965 songs that they had recorded a few years earlier, when their sound was much gentler and the band placed much less emphasis on the instrumentation. As a result, we are given a chance to listen to old songs (or “oldies”, as John refers to them at one point) played with a much heavier sound. George’s guitar playing often figures more prominently in some of these old songs (as is the case in “If I Fell”), while Paul clearly enjoys pumping up the volume of his bass, as he would increasingly do with each passing year. As Paul once said, after recording the band’s first albums he no longer felt constrained to abide by the convention of keeping the bass volume low. He had in fact begun to dominate the band’s sound with his innovative and melodic bass playing, which is manifested to some extent in these performances.

In these performances Paul, George and Ringo are not always in top form in their singing, but John’s singing, in spite of the nervousness he clamed to have experienced during these concerts, has an immediacy that can easily send shivers down a listener’s spine. On the other hand, John and Paul’s signature vocal harmonies are near perfect, save for a few exceptions, which I will point out below. This is a remarkable artistic accomplishment when considers how difficult these vocal harmonies are to perform live. Though John and Paul’s 2-part singing (or John, Paul and George’s throughout 3-part singing in “Yes It Is”, “This Boy” and “Because”, or parts of songs such as the intro to “Nowhere Man” or “Eleanor Rigby”) is what truly sets the Beatle’s music apart from that of other Rock or Pop bands, few fans are aware of what they are hearing when they listen to the band’s trademark vocal harmonies. Most fans do not realize that in these vocal duets (or trios when George joins in) the Beatles are not singing in unison, as most vocal groups do, that is, they are not singing exactly the same melody. Instead, one of them (usually Paul) sings roughly the same melody at a higher pitch (usually a third), thus creating the richer sound that we have come to associate with the Beatle’s vocal harmonies. For those interested in musical technicalities, in part-singing one of the singers sings roughly the same melody at an interval of one third from the other singer (or one fifth or sixth as in the middle section in a minor key of “Norwegian Wood”). For example, if John sings the note C, Paul sings E simultaneously (which is referred to as a “third” since the interval C - E comprises three notes, namely, C - D - E); if John sings F, Paul sings A at the same time, and so on. This is a vocal technique prevalent in Nashville music, as I was told (but cannot confirm since I know virtually noting about country music), which the Beatles had mastered during their stay in Hamburg when half-drunken German businessmen would approach them onstage to ask them to perform show tunes or other popular classics from that era. Nothing in the Beatles’s discography impresses me more from a musical point of view than the ease with which John, Paul and George could do part-singing (though George did confess that singing three-part harmonies for “Because” proved to be difficult). Counted few Rock or Pop singers could do part-singing, let alone live, for lack of the musical ear that it requires. In that regard these performances are a testament to the Beatles’ supreme musicianship.


The first disc begins with a long-winded, pompous introduction by a disc jockey which lasts -- unnecessarily -- well over 5 minutes to the concert they gave on the 23rd of August 1964. After the introduction the concert kicks off with a good cover of “Twist and Shout”. Noteworthy is that the tempo is somewhat upped and that Paul’s bass is considerably louder than in the officially released version. Unfortunately, there are some problems with the sound, specifically, Paul and George’s backing vocals do not come out clear at first.

Next is an excellent performance of “You Can’t Do That”. John’s singing is superb in this track but the track is marred by the aforementioned sound problems. George’s guitar playing comes out very clear however.

Next is a rocking performance of “All My Loving”. Worthy of mentioning is the vocal harmony towards the end. John’s blazing fast strumming of his electric guitar -- of which he was justifiably proud -- comes out very clear.

The next track is a great performance of “She Loves You”, in which the vocal duet by John and Paul (joined later in unison by George for the “Yeah, yeah, yeah” chorus line) electrifies the crowd for good reason. The final “yeah” is a crystal clear vocalization.

In the next track, “Things We Said Today”, Paul’s singing is flawless but the sound problems regrettably become even more noticeable than before. There are also a few glitches in the vocal duet just before the middle section begins. The beginning of this middle section has a staggering increase of the guitar accompaniment to great effect.

The next track is a great cover by George’s of Chuck Berry’s classic rocker “Roll over Beethoven”. His guitar playing in the intro stands out. Unfortunately, the sound of his guitar fades away at times.

In the next track, “Can’t Buy Me Love”, Paul invites the audience to join in. Paul gives a good performance, though his voice in the version in “A Hard Days’ Night” is far more commanding.

The next track is “If I Fell”, where John and Paul’s part-singing is entrancing. Since the volume of George’s guitar is pumped up a bit the arpeggios that he plays on his electric guitar come out clearer than in the version in “A Hard Day’s Night”. This makes this version very interesting per se.

The next track is a version of “I Want to Hold Your Hand”. Though the vocal duets are stupendous, Paul’s voice seems strained and even fails when he reaches the high-pitch note in the word “Hand” in the verse “I want to hold your hand”. This is perhaps the weakest number of the set played for this concert.

The next track is Ringo’s turn to take center stage with his cover of “Boys”. He does a great job but if we listen carefully it is Paul with his great bass playing who commands our attention.

The next track is a good cover of “A Hard Day’s Night”. George’s highly inspired virtuosic solo is not as accurately performed as in the eponymous album or in the next disc of this set however.

The concert ends with a great cover of “Long Tall Sally” by Paul. His singing is very powerful and the band plays good backing to his vocal efforts.

The next track is the introduction to the concert the Beatles gave at the same venue roughly a year later, on the 30th of August 1965. As in the year before, this concert kicks off with a cover of “Twist and Shout” by John. The performance is very good and fortunately the vocal harmonies are not marred by sound problems this time.

The next track is a rendition of “She’s a Woman”. Paul’s sings this very well without straining his voice while George plays a nice guitar solo with his characteristic polished technique.

The next track is a great rendition of “I Feel Fine” The vocal harmonies by John and Paul stand out as they are immaculately clean. Also worthy of being mentioned is George’s polished lead guitar playing.

The next track is a cover of “Dizzy Miss Lizzie” The crowd goes ecstatic when John begins to sing, justifiably so since his powerful voice truly soars in this track. In addition, George’s guitar work comes out very clear.

The next track is a wonderful version of “Ticket to Ride”. The vocal harmonies are virtually flawless in this track despite the difficulties that they entail. Of interest is that George’s licks at the end are different from those that he played in the fadeout in the album “Help!”.

Next George sings a good cover of rockability’s classic tune by Carl Perkins (one of George’s heroes) “Everybody’s Trying to Be My Baby”. Unfortunately, the guitar amplifier seems to be having problems causing the sound to fade at times. Paul plays great bass to this simple rocker (listen to the downward scale he plays during the course of the first and second guitar solo).

Paul then invites the crowd to join for the next song, “Can’t Buy Me Love” He gives a good rendition, though his voice is more raucous than in “A Hard Day’s Night”. The guitar accompaniment in the main section sounds a bit bluesier than in that album.

Before performing the next track, “Baby Is in Black”, John thanks and compliments Paul for the song he just finished singing (which makes us wonder whether he was still the leader of the band). The vocal harmonies by John and Paul are impeccable in this track. This is a truly outstanding live version of the song.

The next track is the obligatory number given to Ringo in all concerts, on this occasion he sings “I Wanna Be Your Man” (a song that John and Paul must have held in such low esteem that they had offered to the Rolling Stones to record). Ringo does a passable job at singing this song.

John next thanks Ringo and then introduces the next song, “A Hard Day’s Night”. John sings this with much aplomb. George plays his great solo with perfection. The ending is interesting since it is not the fade-out played for the version included in the eponymous album.

The next song is “Help!”. Though Paul and George’s backing vocals during the intro are rather shaky, the rest of the singing is first-rate. John is as always his dependable self and gives a great rendition.

The concert ends with a powerful rendition of “I’m Down”. Paul is in top form in this number. This is truly an outstanding performance by him. George plays a simple but effective solo. The band really rocks hard in this song, while John pounds the keyboards.


The second disc of this set begins with the instrument fine-tuning of the concert given on the 29th of August, 1965 at the same venue, while we hear the audience brimming with anxiousness. The atmosphere seems to be truly electrifying. The concert kicks off with an intense, great cover of “Twist and Shout” by John. Unfortunately, since Paul’s microphone fails to capture his singing, we only hear John’s signing, which makes the track interesting in its own way, though the ending sounds truly bizarre as Paul’s voice is not added to John’s voice. Noteworthy is that the accompaniment is heavier than in the officially released version.

The next track is a rendition of “She’s A Woman”, in which the sound problems regrettably persist. Though Paul sings the lead vocal in this song, given that his microphone continues to be disconnected or his voice amplifier malfunctioning, we hear a de-facto instrumental version of this song until John joins Paul for the chorus. This per se makes it a truly fascinating track. We can clearly hear John strumming the chords on his guitar and George adding licks throughout until he plays his solo. After the solo the instrumental accompaniment gains in intensity to great effect, awhile Paul’s singing falis to be recorded.

The next track is “I Feel Fine”, where the band’s playing is first-rate. John gives a great a rendition while George, Paul and Ringo each play their respective musical instruments with proficiency.

The next track is a cover of “Dizzy Miss Lizzie”, which in my opinion sounds far better than the lackluster cover (often maligned by Beatle fans) recorded for “Help!” The sound is heavier for one and John’s vocals are outstanding on this track while George does some nice guitar work when he stops playing the song’s tediously repetitive riff. This track proves beyond a doubt that the band could play some great straightforward Rock & Roll live.

The next track is an stupendous take of “Ticket to Ride”, which the Beatles play considerably heavier than in “Help!”. This is not surprising however since John was proud of being ahead of its time for sounding heavy. Paul’s bass is explosive in the intro. while George’s guitar licks at the end are slightly different than those he played in the version included in the album “Help!” When Paul adds his voice to John’s in the verse “She would never be free…” the crowd goes berserk and with good reason since this 2-part-singing is truly magnificent.

The next song is a great cover by George of “Everybody’s Trying to Be My Baby”. Unfortunately, the sound problems resurface again in this track, though fortunately only briefly. The guitar solo he plays is of interest.

The next track is a good rendition of “Can’t Buy Me Love”, where Paul’s voice is unfortunately not well recorded. Ringo pounds his drums in this track. George’s solo is slightly different from what he played for “A Hard Day’s Night” and it does not end satisfyingly (I believe that he might have made a mistake).

John then mentions the problems that Paul is having with his amplifier and then introduces the next track, “Baby Is in Black”, as a slow waltz (which it technically is). John and Paul’s part singing in this track borders perfection despite being recorded live. Paul’s duet in the chorus (“Oh how long will it take…”) also stands out for its purity.

The next track is the obligatory concession to Ringo, “I Wanna Be Your Man” (not counting the rooftop concert, John and Paul made it a point to have every member of the band sing at least one number during their concerts).

The next song is “A Hard Day’s Night”, in which the sound problems again resurface and are mentioned at the end the song by John, who blames Paul’s amplifier. Paul seems to be straining his voice to sing the part that John gave to him in the middle section (“When I’m home…”) because he acknowledged that Paul found it easier to reach high-pitch notes. George plays his inspired solo with great accuracy while John and Paul’s duet at the end is performed with perfection.

John then mentions once again Paul’s problems with his amplifier, before introducing the next song performed, “Help!”. In this track Paul and George’s backing vocals are beautifully performed. The guitar playing is also more intense than in the version recoded for the eponymous album

The concert ends, as most Beatle concerts from that era ended, with a rendition of “I’m Down”. Paul sings out his heart out in this track while George plays a rocking solo. John on the other hand goes berserk on the electric keyboard (just like in the Shea Stadium performance of this song), perhaps also sliding his elbow on the keys as he had done in the Shea Stadium.

The final two tracks are recordings of two backstage press conferences. In the first press conference we first hear Derek Taylor expressing his gratitude for the warm reception that the band had received in America. Next is an interview with Ringo and then John. They are asked which were the worst questions posed to them by journalists. John seems somewhat upset that he was once asked about his book writing. He is then asked some interesting and somewhat controversial questions, first whether the American youth is trying to grow too fast, and then about the war. Surprisingly, John does not shy away from replying to the latter question, despite the explicit instructions that Brian Epstein had given the band to steer away from discussing controversial issues, particularly the ongoing war (this was the time in which the Vietnam War was increasingly becoming a hotly debated issue in the media). John and Ringo are then asked about quarrels between the members of the band.

This is followed by another press conference, where the Beatles are asked numerous questions, such as about their vacation in the U.S., Bob Dylan, changes in their sound, etc. They are then justifiably asked why Capitol leaves out tracks from their British records. Paul is asked how they select the songs that they perform live. One very interesting question which they are asked is which American band they admire the most (their answer is “The Birds”).

In a nutshell, this a must-have bootleg for any serious Beatle collector. The sound is crisp and the performances outstanding. Even John and Paul’s banter onstage makes this bootleg worthwhile having!



Want to add your review ? Are you a BootlegZone member yet ? Then log in first !





Filename: rpm101
Originally filled by: Chris J., xdj31@dial.pipex.co
Date of creation: 06 Oct 2001 23:59:59
Last filled by: Aidanymous
Last Revision Date : 03 Jan 2012 11:14:21
Online on : 16 Nov 2006
Type of media: Bootleg CD
The Complete Hollywood Bowl Concerts
THE COMPLETE HOLLYWOOD BOWL CONCERTS (CD 1)
THE COMPLETE HOLLYWOOD BOWL CONCERTS (CD 2)
THE COMPLETE HOLLYWOOD BOWL CONCERTS (DISC 1)
THE COMPLETE HOLLYWOOD BOWL CONCERTS (DISC 2)

Revision history
Version 1 (28 Apr 1998)

New Entry - Vocals/song intro transriptions and interview source outstanding.

xdj31.............................


Copyright © 1996-2017 BootlegZone & François Vander Linden
It is forbidden to use anything present on these pages for ANY KIND of project without appropriate permission.


These pages require a minimum resolution of 800x600. A higher resolution is highly recommended for a better browsing experience.

This page was created in 0.026 seconds.

Server time: 26 May 2017 09:20:46 CET